iOS 7 and “Insta-Delete”

Posted by: on Jul 19, 2013 in Blog | Tags: , , | No Comments

There’s a recent post from Dermot Daly of Tapadoo making the argument that if you don’t update your iOS app to fit iOS 7’s new design, it’s going to be an insta-delete.

I think someone needs to take a deep breath and calm down.

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Xcode “Hard Mode”

Posted by: on Mar 29, 2013 in Blog | Tags: , , , , , | No Comments

In 2009, Peter Hosey wrote Warnings I turn on, and why. It remains an excellent explanation of why certain warnings, off by default, are a good idea to use. In it, he mentions the use of “treat warnings as errors” and calls it “hardass mode.”

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Is the Mac App Store Healthy?

Posted by: on Aug 17, 2012 in Blog | Tags: , | No Comments

One of the topics during the Reverse Q&A Panel at CocoaConf Columbus last weekend was how people felt about the Mac App Store and selling apps on it. Now that Apple is enforcing the sandbox requirements, some Mac developers have stopped selling on it and others are considering it.

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Use a RAM Disk for DerivedData

Posted by: on Aug 15, 2012 in Blog | Tags: , , , , , | No Comments

Here’s a tip I picked up last night at our local Cocoaheads meeting: if you have a lot of RAM in your machine and a decent chunk of it is not currently in use, create a RAM disk and mount it at ~/Library/Developer/Xcode/DerivedData.

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Paid Upgrades

Posted by: on Jun 20, 2012 in Blog | Tags: , , | No Comments

Paid upgrades in Apple’s App Stores has been a topic of some debate since the App Stores launched. Wil Shipley stoked the fires back in March, arguing that the Mac App Store needs paid upgrades:

Right now developers selling through the Mac App Store face a lose/lose choice: either provide all major upgrades to existing customers for free (thus losing a quarter of our revenue), or create a “new” product for each major version (creating customer confusion) and charge existing customers full price again (creating customer anger).

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Syncing Core Data with iCloud

Posted by: on Jun 16, 2012 in Blog | Tags: , , , | No Comments

If you’re considering syncing Core Data to iCloud in your app, Drew McCormack of The Mental Faculty has a terrific series of articles discussing the difficulties he encountered while adding support for it to Mental Case.

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Unit Testing Cocoa with MacRuby

Posted by: on Sep 29, 2011 in Blog | Tags: , , , , , , | No Comments

I spend most of my development time split between Rails and iOS. Each offers a rich API that makes building projects much more productive and enjoyable. There is one place, however, that Ruby clobbers Objective-C: testing.

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Your Own Private WWDC 2011

Posted by: on Jul 1, 2011 in Blog | Tags: , , , , | No Comments

Now that Apple has released the complete set of WWDC 2011 videos to registered developers, those of us who couldn’t make it to the conference have the opportunity to hear about all the new, shiny stuff coming in Mac OS X 10.7 and iOS 5.

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The iOS In-App Purchases Requirement

Posted by: on Feb 21, 2011 in Blog | Tags: , , , | No Comments

Marco Arment lays out the arguments against Apple’s new in-app purchase requirements for iOS apps:

This is partially defensible: Apple’s promotions in the App Store certainly bring a lot of people to apps, and it’s all happening on their hardware and platform. But if someone wants the Wall Street Journal app and finds it by searching for “WSJ” in the App Store and selecting it directly, who really brought that customer to the app?

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Apple Isn’t Earning Their 30%

Posted by: on Jan 31, 2011 in Blog | Tags: , , , | 4 Comments

Much has been said over the last 2½ years about the App Store and places where Apple is failing third-party developers. Many things have been fixed, but unfortunately, many more have been neglected or only partially addressed. On January 22, 2011, the App Store surpassed 10 billion downloads. Let’s assume 1% of those are paid and Apple only takes the minimum 29¢ for each one. That’s still $29 million. Apple needs to do a lot more to earn their 30% cut.

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